How to Calm Down a Hyper Dog

Behavior Recent July 27, 2022

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How to Calm Down a Hyper Dog

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If you have a hyper dog then most likely he is in desperate need of physical, mental, and social stimulation. An overly hyper dog is totally normal so there is no need to worry.

Most dogs, especially certain breeds have a lot of energy to burn off and need daily activity. While owning a hyper dog may seem like a lot of work, there is hope once you understand the causes and solutions for hyperactivity.

There are many reasons your dog may be hyper. Often times just a loud noise can scare your dog and cause him to become anxious. In some cases, your dog may hide or tense up but some dogs can become restless or hypervigilant. This results in pacing, shaking, or making noises.

Other reasons your dog may have a hard time settling down could be factors like his breed type, a lack of stimulation, or maybe even a poor diet. Your dog may also be hyper due to excitement, happiness, or boredom.

Understanding why your dog is being hyper and identifying possible medical reasons can help and in some cases, your veterinarian may be able to prescribe medication to calm your pup down.

What Can You Do for a Hyper Dog?

Get Your Dog Exercise

If your dog has too much energy, he maybe suffering from lack of activity. If you have a high energy breed it is important to develop an exercise routine to keep that excess energy burned off.

There are high energy dog breeds that have a harder time settling down even after exercise and activities. This is when games and play time can come in handy with energy burners like tug rope and fetch works well. Some dogs can even benefit from agility courses and running around a dog park.

Ignore Your Dog

A simple way to calm a hyper dog is to just ignore him. Some dogs know that certain behaviors will get them attention and doing the opposite will train them. If your dog is running around barking for no apparent reason, the best solution is pretending he isn’t even there.

Offer Mental Stimulation

Stimulating your dogs brain can also keep him calm. Toys like puzzles, treat-release toys or other activities that appeal to your pups natural instincts can slow him down.

Stay Calm

You may not realize it but your dog can pick up on your emotions and reflect your temperament with subtle cues. If you are in a calm and assured mood, then your dog will copy that behavior. If you appear stressed, then your dog will likely pick up on that and mimic that behavior as well.

Staying calm and showing your dog a relaxed demeanor will help calm your dog in some cases.

Give Your Dog a Job

You can deter your dogs hyper behavior by giving him a job to do and redirecting his energy elsewhere. Having a task to focus on can be a great help. Just putting a backpack on your dog can make him feel like he has a purpose and is helping his owner in some way.

Provide Your Dog a Balanced Diet

Food sensitivities like allergies can contribute to hyper behavior, especially if your dog is uncomfortable. Always give your dog a both complete and balanced diet for his stage of life. If you are not sure which food is best for your pup, you can always talk to your veterinarian.

When is it Time for a Medical Evaluation?

There are a few underlying medical conditions, like metabolic disease associated with liver dysfunction, hyperthyroidism, and neurological conditions, that can show up as hyper activity in dogs. If you are concerned about your dog’s hyper behavior, or if there has been a sudden change in his behavior, talk to your veterinarian and have him diagnosed.

Your vet can conduct some tests and observe the behavior of your hyper active dog to determine if he is clinically hyperactive. Your dog can get a prescription for medications that is a canine versions of Adderall, Concerta, and Dexedrine drugs. Your vet can also recommend certain calming exercises to try on your pup.

Dog Breed That are Known for Being Hyper

Some specific dog breeds are known to have a lot of energy. Below are some breed groups that are more likely to display hyper personalities.

  • Herding Breeds – These dogs are energetic by nature. These types of breeds instinctively seek to herd people and other animals.

  • Sighthounds – Also known as gazehounds, these breeds are bred to hunt and chase prey. These dogs rely upon speed and agility to keep up with their target not scent. They are high-speed, short-distance runners who do not respond to humans when after prey. These breeds can be tough to train because of their hyper activity and need for speed.

  • Sporting Dogs – Sporting dog breeds tend to be intelligent and alert companions. These breeds of dog were bred to retrieve birds when given direction from humans. Sporting dogs were bred to work along side hunters and they naturally love outdoor field activities.

Top 25 Most Hyper Dog Breeds

If you are looking specifically for a hyper and energetic dog breed for a companion, there are many that are known for their excess energy. However, the exact amount of hyper activity will vary among individual dogs based on their temperaments and personality. Here is a list of breeds that are more likely to be hyper:

  • Airedale terrier
  • Australian shepherd
  • Beagle
  • Belgian malinois
  • Border collie
  • Boxer
  • Brittany spaniel
  • Chihuahua
  • Dalmation
  • English pointer
  • English springer spaniel
  • German shepherd
  • Golden retriever
  • Irish setter
  • Jack Russell terrier
  • Labrador retriever
  • Miniature pinscher
  • Pembroke welsh corgi
  • Poodle
  • Shetland sheepdog
  • Siberian husky
  • Staffordshire bull terrier
  • Vizsla
  • Weimaraner
  • Yorkshire terrier

Final Thoughts

It is important to manage your dog’s excess energy by making sure he gets enough physical and mental exercise. Some dogs are just more hyper active than others due to the characteristics of their breeds. If your pup’s hyper activity maybe related to anxiety or an underlying medical condition, your vet can recommend how to help your dog.

Amy Brown is a Certified NAVC Pet Nutritionist and pet lover. She is the proud owner of two cats and a dog and her love for animals has led her to a successful career as a freelance writer specializing in pet care, nutrition, and product reviews.
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